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Recent Political Ads Show Party is Split on Medicare Spending

Typically, the country is split right down the middle in political affairs. People tend to lean toward one party or the other when it comes to their voter support. However, if you are paying close attention to ad campaigns, you will soon see that within the parties themselves, it is not so black and white when it comes to Medicare spending. Take a look at the article by  JONATHAN WEISMAN posted on thecaucus.blogs.nytimes.com about how recent political ads show party is split on Medicare Spending and keep this in mind when you support someone based on party alone.

Recent Political Ads Show Party is Split on Medicare Spending

Among the Republican fiscal hawks, the 2012 election is supposed to be a stark choice between a Republican Party willing to make the tough spending decisions necessary to get the deficit under control and a profligate Democratic Party still relying on “Mediscare” tactics to avoid responsibility.

Republican campaigns do not appear to be ready to embrace this message.

Jesse Kelly, the Republican running in a special election for the House seat vacated by Gabrielle Giffords, just released an advertisement blasting his Democratic opponent, Ron Barber, a former Giffords aide, for supporting the 2010 health care law, which cut more than a half-trillion from Medicare.

“Don’t let Ron Barber cut my benefits, Jesse. I’ve earned them,” an elderly man tells the candidate plaintively.

“Don’t worry, Grandpa, I won’t,” he responds.

The ad is a response to a Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee ad accusing Mr. Kelly of favoring the slow elimination of Social Security and Medicare, while favoring tax cuts for the rich.

The committee’s ad neatly backs the election choice set up by deficit hawks like Representative Paul D. Ryan, Republican of Wisconsin and the author of two successive House-passed budgets, which would convert Medicare from a government-run insurance program to a menu of competing private and public options subsidized by the government.

If you were not aware that recent political ads show party is split on Medicare Spending, then you may want to dig a little bit deeper into the individual voting records of the other individuals, who may be of the same party, but who are not of the same mindset. As a voter, it is up to you to stand up for yourself when it comes to your healthcare.


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